Bunion Treatment Tips

Bunion Treatment TipsA bunion is a bony bump that grows on the joint at the base of your big toe. It forms when your big toe pushes against your next toe and forces the joint of your big toe to enlarge and stick out. Treatment options vary according to the type and severity of the bunion and a surgical procedure is the most invasive method. Below are some helpful bunion treatment tips.

Surgery: This operation is also known as a bunionectomy. A doctor performs the procedure in a hospital or surgery center under local anesthesia with sedation or general anesthesia. The surgeon can realign the bone behind your big toe by cutting the ligaments at the joint.

Bunion Pads and Orthotics: You can buy bunion pads at a pharmacy or grocery store. They cushion and protect your bunion. Another option is orthotics which is custom-made supports that you place just behind the big toe joint on the bottom of your foot. They redistribute your weight while you walk and take pressure off your big toe.Schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can do an evaluation and fitting for you.

Stretchable Shoes: These are a good solution for very large bunions. They have a special design that combines suede leather and spandex and they are flexible and breathable. The shoes stretch to conform to the contours of your foot, accommodate foot deformities and eliminating pressure on your bunions.

Physical Therapy: This provides relief from bunion inflammation and pain. One popular technique is ultrasound therapy for treating bunions and their associated soft tissue involvement.

Plantar Warts and Foot Wart Removal are Best Handled by Licensed Podiatrists

Plantar Warts and Foot Wart Removal are Best Handled by Licensed PodiatristsHuman papilloma virus has long been associated with a number of skin growths, including mosaic and plantar warts. Unlike some other warts commonly attributed to the virus, they are potentially hard to treat because of where they are located. Think about it. As humans, we are on our feet every day and that added pressure can not only irritate plantar warts but make it difficult to treat them. So, when homegrown or over-the-counter treatments don’t work, people should seek professional, foot wart removal.

Professional, foot wart removal often involves products that are similar to over-the-counter options. However, they are much stronger and purchasing them requires a podiatrist’s prescription. Examples include topical creams that contain salicylic acid. The tropical creams are generally prescribed first because the side effects are minimal to non-existent. Depending on the cream’s strength, it may take a week or more for the treatment to work.

Podiatrists may also choose to use foot wart removal techniques that must be performed in the office. The list of in-office treatments includes, but is not limited to trichloroacetic acid, bichloracetic acid, cryotherapy, pulsed-dye lasers, immune therapy and vaccines. Understandably, the potential side effects associated with these treatment options are typically more extensive. For example, there may be risk of pain and secondary infection.

If all of those methods fail, podiatrists may opt to recommend electrodessication and curettage. It is a same-day surgical procedure that must be performed in an acute care setting. Most of the time, a local anesthetic is used to numb the area prior to surgical, foot wart removal. However, patients with a low tolerance for pain or those who have other health problems too may need to rely on another pain reduction method.

Afterward, podiatrists usually recommend that their patients follow post-surgical care instructions. The instructions may include minor downtime to give the surgical time to heal properly before engaging in weight-bearing activities. To learn more about plantar warts and foot wart removal, please contact a podiatrist today.

You can Fix your Corns & Calluses on your Feet

Get Rid of Foot Corns and Calluses Before Warm Weather ArrivesCorn and calluses are thick layers of dead skin that normally develop on your feet and toes. They are caused by excessive friction or pressure often from ill-fitting, tight shoes. Another cause is due to frequent, repetitive motions such as running that cause friction between the bones, skin and shoes. There are different ways to treat these embarrassing foot conditions. Here are just some of the proven methods at treating them.

One method is investing in surgery. This is a necessary option for removing stubborn corns, but it is rare. However, if your corns and calluses are not relieved by periodic shaving, shoe inserts or padding, this option is the way to go.

Another option is treating your corns and calluses yourself. You could do this by soaking your feet in warm water. After drying your feet, rub them gently with a pumice stone. Moisturize them with a good foot lotion. Repeat every day or every few days as needed.

Here is a natural remedy for treating corns that looks interesting. Place a raisin on top of the corn and hold it in place with a band-aid. The raisin will soften the corn and serve as a cushion to reduce pressure on the sensitive spot. You could find this idea here.

The last option in treating these foot conditions is seeing a foot specialist, or a podiatrist. If your corn or callus makes it hard for you to even walk, you may want to consider this option. A podiatrist may suggest special padding or shoe inserts that could relieve some of the stress on your feet. However, if your corn or callus is painful, he may just shave it away.
Getting rid of foot corns & calluses isn’t easy, but with a lot of effort it can be accomplished. Just be sure to wear comfortable shoes as much as possible. For more information on corns and calluses, visit www.health.harvard.edu/pain/calluses-and-corns.

Athletes with Foot Problems Make News Again in May 2015

Athletes with Foot Problems Make News Again in May 2015In late May 2015, several athletes with foot problems made the national news. Perhaps you’ve heard about the one involving basketball star, Kyle Korver? During an Eastern Conference final against the Cleveland Cavaliers, he unfortunately sprained his right ankle. The 34-year-old pro is expected to spend some time off of the courts recovering. Of course that’s the kind of news that will likely dampen the mood of even the most optimistic Atlanta Hawks fans.

Over the years, much has been written about foot problems in sports and ankle sprains in particular. Studies have been conducted on the topic for decades too. One of the more recent ones was published in a January 2010 issue of The Journal of Family Practice. Although dated, it is in lock step with previous studies and makes a strong argument for the use of preventive medicine.

Podiatrists Recommend Being Proactive Regardless of Career Status

Preventive medicine has obviously come a long way since 2010. As such, athletes with foot problems have a variety of treatment options at their disposal. We’ve listed some, but not all of the treatment options below:

  • Temporary Cessation of Activity or Early Retirement
  • Use of Standard or High-Tech Orthotics
  • Proprioceptive Therapy or Training
  • Use of Special Athletic Shoes (Varies by Sport)
  • Physical Therapy
  • Use of Sports Tape and Specialty Braces
  • ROM and Strength Training Exercises

Of course the list of suggested treatments for athletes with foot problems will vary based on the types of injuries involved. Ankle sprains tend to be among the most common and insidious for athletes because of the potential for long-term effects. For example, athletes that sustain grade three ankle sprains are very likely to experience ligament weakness for extended periods of time. As such, their careers, not to mention their health, may take unexpected hits. To learn more about athletic related ankle injuries, please consult with a podiatrist.

Boston Office
1153 Centre Street
Suite 5C
Boston, MA 02130
(617) 983-1900
Marlborough Office
340 Maple Street
Suite 405
Marlborough, MA 01752
(508) 303-8188
Middleton Office
191 South Main Street
Suite 102
Middleton, MA 01949
(978) 774-2800
All Rights Reserved © 2013-2018 Matthew P. Butler, DPM, LLC | Google+
Massachusetts Foot Doctor | Massachusetts Podiatry Offices
Podiatrist Websites provided by PodiatristSites.com